Romanarmy en acción: investigamos dous posibles campamentos en La Mesa

• Trátase dos recintos de El Xuegu la Bola (Arvechales, Somiedo) y Cueiru (Taxa, Teverga), ubicados a 1700 e a 1440 metros de altitude, sendo os sitios arqueolóxicos militares romanos a máis altitud da Mesa.
• No proxecto interveñen arqueólogos de diferentes institucións científicas españolas e europeas vinculados ao grupo romanarmy.eu
• A difusión dos achados farase en tempo real a través das redes sociais, nun experimento de divulgación científica

Comprobar a cronoloxía e a adscrición romana de dous importantes recintos militares da vía da Mesa, un dos principais itinerarios de entrada a Asturias desde hai miles de anos, é o principal obxectivo da campaña de prospección que se inicia este domingo e durará ata o luns 10 de outubro. Un equipo científico conformado por arqueólogos do Instituto de Ciencias do Patrimonio (INCIPIT) do CSIC, das Universidades de Oviedo e Santiago de Compostela, así como das universidades de Durham e Exeter (Reino Unido) e Amsterdam (Holanda) atópase xa sobre o terreo realizando as tarefas de prospección arqueolóxica. A dirección do proxecto é levada a cabo polos arqueólogos Andrés Menéndez Branco, José Manuel Costa e David González.

Divulgación en tempo real
Unha das principais novidades da campaña arqueolóxica é a vontade de difusión e retransmisión en tempo real dos traballos arqueolóxicos, aproximando desta maneira a metodoloxía e a práctica científica aos cidadáns. A comunicación realizarase nas redes sociais, no facebook de Roman Army (www.facebook.com/romanarmynw) e na web corporativa do grupo: www.romanarmy.eu e facilitará a todos os interesados seguir os avances en canto ao recoñecemento dos xacementos e á súa interpretación. A través de formatos didácticos, ensaiaranse novos procedementos e estratexias de comunicación científica dirixida ao público xeral.

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Photo Courtesy of TEDxGalicia (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0)

On 16th July, TEDx Galicia 2016 was held in the City of Culture (Santiago de Compostela). Through the main topic “what is the future made of?” the event aimed to reflect on the importance of past and present in shaping the future and, therefore, of our own responsibility in its design. Throughout the day, several interventions allowed to explore various visions of everyday life, trying to open our approach to reality as well as to define where do we walk as individuals and as a society.

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Páginas desdeCOSTA_GARCIA_NAILOS_3

These days the latest issue of the journal Nailos, edited by the Association of Independent Professional Archaeologists of Asturias (APIAA), has been released. An article on the camps of Castrocalbón / Castrucarbón (León) written by our colleague Jose Costa can be found in its pages.

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Páginas desdefolleto_romanarmy

Last thursday (12/05/16) the Galician Culture Council hosted the fifth conference of the Monographic Meetings with the Cultural Heritage. Our colleagues José Costa, Manuel Gago, Andrés Menendez and João Fonte presented the project Romanarmy.eu through four lectures. The coordinators of the event, Rebecca Blanco-Rotea and Iago Seara (members of the Heritage Section and Bens Culturais of the Council) organised an interesting colloquium with the audience. We present here the full video of the conference courtesy of the Galician Culture Council. If you prefer to go directly any of the lectures, just click on the corresponding image.

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Fonte_et_al_GeniusLoci_final_1

Lino Tavares Dias and António Baptista Lopes stated the existence of a Roman military camp up in the very top of the Serra do Marão (Portugal). A rectangular enclosure and a stone tower would be the archaeological evidence sustaining that interpretation. This sugested Roman camp (the only one catalogued in Northern Portugal) was also identified thanks to an inscription carved over a rock located in the nearby: Castra Oresbi. However, the meagre archaeological evidence implied the to the refusal of this interpretation by some scholars (like C. M. Martins).

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Menendez_et_al_Tras_las_huellas_Genius Loci_pt2

After concluding several research experiences in different areas of NW Iberia, we have assessed the potential and limitations of various techniques in a wide range of land types. The usefulness for archeological survey  of those techniques has been totally attested thought an intense testing. In this paper, presented during the congress named Genius Loci: Places and Meanings, we show a methodological proposal  for the detection and study of archaeological features related to the Roman military presence in these territories. Continue Reading

Páginas desdeAARGnews52

The last volume of AARGnews newsletter, edited by the Aerial Archaeology Research Group (AARG) includes a paper signed by all of us. We present a low-cost methodology combining historical and modern aerial photography, satellite imagery, airborne LiDAR, GIS and conventional archaeological field survey techniques. Likewise, it can be considered the international launch of the romanarmy.eu project.

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port

5 June 1921. Spain attends with some somnolence to the escalation of violence that will lead to the famous colonial disaster of Annual. As expected, this situation resonates like a more distant echo in rural Galicia, where the only revolution are the sporadic but typical downpours of the last days of spring. However, the peaceful place of “A Cibdade”, located on the north bank of the Limia River, receives a rare visit. This time, not only the inhabitants of the close villages of Portoquintela and Baños de Bande come to dig the land, but also four particularly well-dressed figures are approaching. They are Ramón Otero Pedrayo, Florentino López Cuevillas and Vicente Risco, prominent Galicianist intellectuals from the capital city of Ourese. The fouth well-known person is Farruco Pena, a local lawyer.

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O Baixo Miño desde o Alto do Cervo
The  lower course of the river Minho from o Alto do Cervo

Campos is situated on the outskirts of São Pedro da Torre (Valença, Portugal), on the banks of the Minho River. Here, the Galicians built a star-shaped fortification, the fort of San Luís Gonzaga, during the Portuguese Restoration War (1640-1668). In order to cut the advance of these troops on Portuguese lands the Portuguese elaborated a strategy. As the chronicles narrate, they built a series of watchtowers and fortresses, equidistant from the fort’s by a cannon shot.

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